Disturbed - Asylum

Album cover
Metal
Reprise Records
Disturbed
Asylum
Disturbed - Asylum Review rating:
3.5
User rating:
Average: 4.7 (30 votes)

Let’s refrain from name calling and simply call Disturbed consistent; they’ve manage to chug out these half epic metal albums for seven years now and certainly show no signs of running dry. Along with all the gimmicks they constantly employ (recall those vengeful shouts kicking off “Down With the Sickness”) there are continuous strains of evolution coupled with inescapable bouts of regression. Though Indestructible tried shedding the plagues the band had developed throughout the majority of the career, over ties with nu-metal and serious rages with clichéd adjectives, it wasn’t able to completely dissolve the negatives that surrounded Disturbed critically. Asylum initially showed greater signs of stagnant growth and comfort with just succeeding with outside their stable niche, but now that the album is here it shows a band coming to terms with maturity – and thankfully so.

Maturity is a tough price to come by; essentially one must accept their past as a part of history and try constructing a future upon the learned fundamentals. In music this task is near insurmountable with bands trying to please one base or another, be it their fans or critics, and the outcome almost always leaves a divide. Disturbed however, have always seemed to understand that the music they're creating will be accepted at face value and therefore put more into the technicality then a majority of their contemporaries. Worth it or not this places the band on a pedestal and a leader for their respective radio genre so constant scrutiny is upon them – thus maturity is a must. Asylum is the album that should have been delivered two years ago. It will be hard to understand this though as it feels almost identical to their previous outing Indestructible, but the nuances accompanied here mark different territories making this release a grandeur performance.

This time around the band have dropped the unnecessary monikers and have opted for a more subtle approach. Call it restraint from the familiar but Disturbed feel more natural with Asylum as if they’re making an album that they’ve wanted to make all along. The radio need has been dropped and they actually sound like a metal band half the time. I say half the time because you can only teach an old dog so many new tricks. Album opener “Remnants” is beautiful way to introduce the new artistic side of the band, invigorative solos and all, but the next punch falls to the same tomfoolery that has always subdued them, shouting the title of the song.  Brace yourself as this is a reoccurring theme but one that can be easily overlooked, as it’s the only fault the album exudes.

Ah yes, Disturbed have released an album that out shines their need for filler (something they’ve always been estranged for delivering) and rebukes the ties of their past – for the most part. Of course, you’ll hear no difference between this album and the four that precede it in terms of sound. However, you will hear a new ember burning within both vocalist David Draimin and lead guitarist Dan Donegan. Stepping their game up, the two exert full amounts of force, thicker and more divulged solos embark the guitars with the tightest singing sensation of Draimin’s career accompanying. Disturbed have hit a nail with their hammering aesthetics, finally, and build an aggressive foundation that’s sure to leave both fans critics alike standing firm in their territory.

1. Remnants
2. Asylum
3. The Infection
4. Warrior
5. Another Way To Die
6. Never Again
7. The Animal
8. Crucified
9. Serpentine
10. My Child
11. Sacrifice
12. Innocence

There are 2 acts by the name of Disturbed;

1) Well-known American nu metal/hard rock band with lead singer David Michael Draiman, formed in 1996, with several albums including The Sickness (Giant/Reprise 2000), Believe (Giant/Reprise 2002), Ten Thousand Fists (Reprise, 2005), Indestructible (Reprise, 2008) and Asylum (Reprise, 2010).

2) Late 80's American Thrash band who released the album Disturbing the Peace in 1988; formed by Earl Root in 86/87 and disbanded in 92/93 before his death in 2008.

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