Veara - What We Left Behind

Album cover
Pop-punk
Epitaph Records
Veara
What We Left Behind
Veara - What We Left Behind Review rating:
2.5
User rating:
Average: 3.3 (3 votes)

In music, once a successful formula is created, there are always a myriad of musicians who try to replicate it. This is prevalent trend found throughout the pages of history. When The Beatles took the world by storm in the 1960s, many bands modeled their sound and appearance after them in order to achieve recognition. In their glory days, the Drive-Thru Records roster inspired the creation of countless pop-punk bands made up of kids clad in cargo shorts and knee high socks. With contemporary bands such as Four Year Strong and A Day To Remember experiencing success with their blend of pop-punk and hardcore, bands are now ditching their skateboards in favor of breakdowns. Copies are never as good the original, which causes bands like Veara to come off as generic. Possessing a sound that can be best described as the A Day To Remember without the hardcore screams, Veara is too safe and plastic with their debut full-length What We Left Behind. It is what you expect it to be: a catchy pop-punk album with plentiful breakdowns, gang vocals and double bass hits. It is a fun listen but lacks noteworthy attributes or progressive nature to stay relevant in a growing scene.

“We Have A Body Count” is one of the lone standouts, containing one of the record’s better choruses and hooks. Lyrically, let’s be honest; it is hard to have creative song topics, especially in a genre that contains the word “pop.” Rather, it is the way that you present it that makes it unique. In this case, Veara do an average job, using driving tempos and hooks to offset the clichéd theme of leaving a place you hate. Additional tracks of note, “My B-Side Life” and “Head For The Hills,” can be placed in the same category. They are accessible, but lyrics such as “I guess I’ll just walk it off/And learn to cope without a crutch” in “My B-Side Life” are painfully plain. We are not expecting Shakespearean poetry, but lyricists like Soupy Campbell have demonstrated that lyrics can be novel by infusing local diction or simply by being blunt. Veara have also erred by writing about the same topics; “We Have A Body Count” and “Head For The Hills” revolve around the same point, varying only in lyrics and music. Unless it is a concept album, different subjects are preferred. Luckily, these tracks have infectious hooks that retain some of the audience’s attention. However, too much of this cannot hide the flaws of a release; “Pull Your Own Weight” and “Everything To Lose” are flat out boring. They have the fun and catchy factors working in their favor, but their staying power is poor.

Much like A Day To Remember, Veara struggles to be creative musically; many of their riffs and breakdowns have the same feel. Though they can churn out some pretty fun guitar lines like in “Head For The Hills”, listen to “We Have A Body Count” and “Waste My Time” consecutively. The chord progressions and riffs are extremely similar. In fact, it seems as if only a few notes were changed. In the future, Veara should aim to devise a sound they can call their own. In “Everything To Lose”, the bridge seems to be taken from a song from the band’s Ocala friends; it consists of a harmony between clean vocals and screamed ones. Instead of people saying, “Wow that sounds a lot like A Day To Remember”, the band should strive to have them proclaim, “This is the Veara sound we know and love.” What We Left Behind is a decent listen, but expectations should be tempered. While it shows potential for Veara, the album is bound to get forgotten.

1. We Have A Body Count
2. Better Off Without You
3. My B-Side Life
4. Pull Your Own Weight
5. Waste My Time
6. Role Model
7. Everything To Lose
8. Only Famous People Get Famous
9. Head For The Hills
10. Getting Kicked In The Face Has Never Been So Much Fun

Veara is a pop punk 4-piece from Augusta, GA since December 2003. The band now consists of Bradley Wyrosdick as lead vocals (replacing Ian Reese), and continues to have Patrick Bambrick as Vocals/Guitar, Bryan Kerr on Bass/Vocals, and Brittany Harrell on Drums.

... read more

Did You Know?

Batman
Batman says... "The White Stripes are from Detroit, but they are much bigger in England than the US."

Featured Album

Hawthorne Heights-Hate
Hate
Hawthorne Heights

Recent Interviews

ARIA
ARIA
Tue, September 06, 2011
A Common Year
A Common Year
Thu, September 01, 2011
Mayday Parade
Mayday Parade
Mon, August 22, 2011
Blessthefall
Blessthefall
Tue, August 09, 2011
Stray From the Path
Stray From the Path
Thu, August 04, 2011
The Summer Set
The Summer Set
Wed, July 27, 2011
Psychic Babble
Psychic Babble
Tue, June 28, 2011
Touche Amore
Touche Amore
Fri, June 24, 2011
August Burns Red
August Burns Red
Tue, June 21, 2011
Nocturnal Me
Nocturnal Me
Mon, June 13, 2011
Living With Lions
Living With Lions
Mon, June 13, 2011
Polar Bear Club
Polar Bear Club
Sun, June 12, 2011
The Swellers
The Swellers
Mon, May 23, 2011
Balance And Composure
Balance And Com ...
Sun, May 22, 2011
Protest The Hero
Protest The Hero
Fri, April 29, 2011
Dredg
Dredg
Wed, April 27, 2011
Otep
Otep
Sat, April 23, 2011
Fireworks
Fireworks
Tue, April 12, 2011
Dance Gavin Dance
Dance Gavin Dance
Sun, April 03, 2011
He Is We
He Is We
Sat, March 05, 2011

Powered by Drupal. Eco-friendly hosting provided by Site5 LLC.
All content on this site is licensed under a Creative Commons License .